Does it support Ubuntu Operating system, as a 2nd screen monitor?


#1

Does it support Ubuntu Operating system, as a 2nd screen monitor?


#2

If you look at this video, the Max2 is used as a 2nd monitor for Linux:

In the video they are using VNC. However, I would expect it to work natively with HDMI.
The Max2 has a HDMI input port, I don’t see why it should not work on Linux.
The only think that could be needed is to setup the right resolution and DPI on the Linux desktop, as it might not detect automatically the Max2 properties.


#3

Yes,

Link to the MobileReader forum where the community have not only gotten the Max2 screen to work with Linux and RaspberryPi Rasbpian but also gotten the touchscreen functionality to work.

Screenshot of a mobile setup showing Ubuntu in use

https://www.mobileread.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3685610&postcount=522


#4

Yes.

I shot that (video linked by peter68), I am “they”: I had been testing “desktop remote” techniques because network connections are more universally available than monitor sockets.

But, I used a Ubuntu desktop with the Max2 and the HDMI connection even today (the picture from everalm is again my “mobility” setup). It works very well (though experience is subjective).

I noticed today that the rendering is a bit blurry, since the monitor demands a 2104x1560 resolution, but it is enlarged to the 2200x1650 dot matrix (this has nothing to do with Ubuntu though).

The only think that could be needed is to setup the right resolution and DPI on the Linux desktop,

Resolution, I recommend the native 2104x1560, I think I am using 160 DPI in font scaling (cannot check right now) and high-contrast “appearance style”.

as it might not detect automatically the Max2 properties.

Using a user with a set-up for the purpose profile helps.

Does it support Ubuntu Operating system,

You should be warned that some systems (some hardware?) send a “noisy” HDMI signal - causing continuous screen update, pulsation etc. But, in other systems it works as expected (static screen if the source is static). I experienced both situations using Ubuntu on different machines.

as a 2nd screen monitor

I personally cannot remember having tried as “extension”, but I think other people did. There is no reason why it should not.


#5

A pic from a video shot today: playing with (Linux desktop’s) VLC’s video effects to try and stabilize as much as possible the dots change in playing video.
(That’s to assess the problem with regards to video playing on Android mostly, because anyway the Monitor application does drink some considerable amount of battery - say, 20%/hour - even when the screen contents are very static. When the contents are dynamic - when the screen changes a lot, again using the Monitor application -, the consumption seems to increase very little, say to 25%/hour.)

Max2_Xubuntu_VLC_fx1


#6

I recently connected my Max 2 to a Linux laptop, and it worked. Not very comfortably: every terminal appeared way too small (difficult to read), and I didn’t manage to change the resolution or configure it as a mirror of the main screen, but that’s a problem on my Linux machine, not on the Max I’d say.


#7

but that’s a problem on my Linux machine

It is, you must configure the interface to make it look good on a 13.3’’ screen with high resolution:
if you are using a desktop (Gnome, KDE, XFCE etc.), you may have something like
Settings > Appearance > Fonts > Custom DPI settings → 160dpi
and
Settings > Appearance > Style → High contrast
or similar.